Monday, 22 November 2021

"Freedom to Travel Act of 2021" introduced in Congress

On the 20th anniversary of the creation of the Transportation Security Administration, the Freedom to Travel Act of 2021 (H.R. 6030, “To protect the right to travel by common carrier”), has been introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives.

If enacted into law, the Freedom to Travel Act would be the most significant step toward bringing the TSA within the rule of law since the creation of the TSA 20 years ago this week with the enactment of the Aviation and Transportation Security Act (ATSA) in 2001. It would rein in the TSA’s ability to substitute secret, extrajudicial edicts for court orders restricting American’s rights, and would remove key barriers that have stood in the way of judicial review of TSA actions and legal redress for those whose rights have been violated.

The 20th anniversary of the creation of the TSA is an apt moment for Congress to step back from the post-9/11 panic that drove the enactment of the ATSA, take a deep breath, consider what it has actually wrought, and begin to restore the historic right to travel that the TSA has been steadily chipping away at for the entire 20 years of its existence.

The Freedom to Travel Act would create no new rights, but would codify in Federal law an explicit right to travel by common carrier.

The Freedom to Travel Act would apply to interstate common carriers in all modes of passenger transportation: airlines, railroads including Amtrak, interstate buses, and ferries.

The Freedom to Travel Act would create an explicit new Federal cause of action against any common carrier, person, or Federal agency that denies or refuses transportation by common carrier to any individual except on the basis of (1) failure to pay the fare or comply with the conditions of carriage in the carrier’s published tariff; (2) failure or refusal to submit to an administrative search limited to a search for weapons, explosives, or incendiary devices likely to pose a threat to the safety of the conveyance, passengers, or crew; or (3) an order from a court of competent jurisdiction.

The Freedom to Travel Act would have important benefits from both a consumer and a human rights perspectives.

If you are a U.S. citizen, ask your U.S. Representative to co-sponsor the Freedom to Travel Act (H.R. 6030), and ask your U.S. Senators to introduce a similar bill in the Senate. Urge consumer and civil rights groups to endorse this bill.

Read more from the Identity Project (PapersPlease.org).

Link | Posted by Edward, 22 November 2021, 19:01 ( 7:01 PM) | Comments (0)

Sunday, 14 November 2021

U.S. Senate prepares to expand Selective Service to women as well as men

After months of delay, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced today that the Senate is “likely” to vote this week on an annual defense [sic] bill which includes a provision — already approved by the House of Representatives in its version of the bill — to extend the President’s authority to order men to register with the Selective Service System for a possible military draft to include women as well.

Continue reading "U.S. Senate prepares to expand Selective Service to women as well as men"
Link | Posted by Edward, 14 November 2021, 14:49 ( 2:49 PM) | Comments (3)

Thursday, 4 November 2021

Unity in diversity

What does it mean to be part of a “union” of “independent contractors”? My article below on this question is cross-posted from the blog of the National Writers Union:

The Book Division of the National Writers Union, including Delegates and other NWU members interested in issues related to books, e-books, and audiobooks, met online on October 22, 2021, as part of the 2021 triennial NWU Delegate Assembly (“DA”).

This was an important opportunity to assess what we’ve done, what we are doing, and what remains to be done — together as NWU members, and with allies.

As outgoing Co-Chair of the Book Division and as a Delegate from the Northern California Chapter of the NWU, I gave a report to the Book Division and the Delegates on highlights of the work done in the name of the Book Division, and other national and international advocacy for copyright and writers’ rights by the NWU, since the last DA in 2018. The earlier reports on the NWU’s international advocacy and coalition work to the 2018 DA and the 2016 National Executive Board meeting provide some context, background, and framing of the issues that may be helpful especially to those new to these issues and activities of the NWU.

I have served as Co-Chair of the Book Division since first being nominated from the floor and elected at the 2009 DA, and as de facto sole Chair since 2018.

From those 12 years of experience, I take away two lessons above all others for myself and for other NWU organizers, office-holders, and members:

Continue reading "Unity in diversity"
Link | Posted by Edward, 4 November 2021, 15:36 ( 3:36 PM) | Comments (0)

Friday, 17 September 2021

House votes this week on Selective Service

Key votes in the U.S. House of Representatives on proposals to repeal (unlikely), expand to women (most likely), or eliminate some of the penalties for violations of the Military Selective Service Act will take place the week of 20 September 2021 as part of the debate on this year’s annual National Defense [sic] Authorization Act (NDAA).

Here’s a calendar of the Congressional and Presidential actions that are leading up to women being required to register and report address changes to the Selective Service System starting when women born in 2005 turn 18 in 2023.

Calls to members of the House are needed now, especially to members of the House Rules Committee who will decide this Monday whether the full House will debate or vote on whether to expand draft registration to women (or will enact this as part of a larger bill with no line-item debate or vote on Selective Service).

Continue reading "House votes this week on Selective Service"
Link | Posted by Edward, 17 September 2021, 15:08 ( 3:08 PM) | Comments (1)

Thursday, 2 September 2021

Youth Liberation and Military Conscription

My article on Youth Liberation and Military Conscription is now online in the Summer 2021 issue of the Peace Chronicle, the magazine of the Peace and Justice Studies Association. According to the editor’s introduction to this themed issue on “Youth”:

Edward Hasbrouck offers up thoughtful views on youth and liberation from military conscription. He articulates ageism to anti-draft and anti-war positions, arguing that it is incumbent upon us to see and engage with this additional layer of oppression, the taken-for-granted discrimination that characterizes compulsory service or participation in war. As allies or would-be allies of youth, older adults must see ageism as a problem of older people, just as white people must play a role in resisting and dismantling racism, and men must see feminism as their issue, too. As in other movements, allyship in the anti-draft movement is not just about “saving” those most oppressed but about liberating us all.

Read the full article (free): Youth Liberation and Military Conscription

Link | Posted by Edward, 2 September 2021, 09:05 ( 9:05 AM) | Comments (0)

Wednesday, 1 September 2021

House and Senate Armed Services Committees vote to make women register for the draft

Today the House Armed Services Committee joined the Senate Armed Services Committee in voting 35-24 to expand registration for a possible military draft to include young women as well as young men.

Following today’s House committee vote and an earlier Senate committee vote in July (before Congress’s summer vacation), the versions of the annual “must-pass” National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) to be considered later this fall in both the House and Senate will include provisions requiring women to register for the draft within 30 days of their 18th birthday and report to the Selective Service System each time they change their address until their 26th birthday, as young men have been required to do since 1980.

An alternative compromise amendment to suspend draft registration unless the President declared a national emergency and put the Selective Service System into standby was submitted before today’s committee session, but ruled out of order on the basis of arcane PAYGO procedural rules. Under the same rules, the amendment to the NDAA to expand draft registration to women was ruled in order, considered, and adopted without any antiwar opposition from members of the committee.

Floor amendments may be proposed when the NDAA is considered by the full House and/or the Senate to repeal the Military Selective Service Act, end draft registration entirely, abolish the Selective Service System, or put Selective Service into “standby” as it was from 1975-1980. But even if such amendments are proposed and put to a vote, they have little chance of success in either the House or the Senate.

It’s now overwhelmingly likely that the Fiscal Year 2022 NDAA to be adopted in late 2021 or early 2022 will authorize the President to order women to register for the draft at age 18, starting in 2023 with women born in 2005 and after.

Continue reading "House and Senate Armed Services Committees vote to make women register for the draft"
Link | Posted by Edward, 1 September 2021, 20:31 ( 8:31 PM) | Comments (4)

Wednesday, 14 July 2021

European Commission rejects my complaint against CRSs

Just over four years after finally agreeing to consider my complaint that the lack of passwords and lack of logs of access to Passenger Name Records (PNRs) constitutes a violation of the privacy and data protection provisions (currently under review) of the European Union’s Code of Conduct for Computerized Reservations Systems (CRSs), the European Commission has decided to reject my complaint without any investigation of the facts.

Continue reading "European Commission rejects my complaint against CRSs"
Link | Posted by Edward, 14 July 2021, 13:48 ( 1:48 PM) | Comments (0)

Saturday, 26 June 2021

Air travel, global warming, and the COVID-19 pandemic

I have a long feature today in the Sierra Club’s online magazine, SIERRA, on air travel, global warming, and the COVID-19 pandemic:

The Biden Administration Wants to “Build Back Better” — What Could That Mean for Air Travel?

In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic reduced air travel and its climate footprint to about 10 percent compared to 2019, and environmentalists saw a window of opportunity. But as of this summer, air travel is “recovering” rapidly. Aviation is a significant contributor to global warming. Our planet can ill afford for us to keep building on the same air transportation system. And the problem extends beyond carbon—planes’ nitrogen oxide, sulphate aerosols, and water vapor emissions create contrails and cirrus clouds, potentially doubling their contributions to the climate catastrophe.

What would a policy solution even look like?

Continue reading "Air travel, global warming, and the COVID-19 pandemic"
Link | Posted by Edward, 26 June 2021, 05:47 ( 5:47 AM) | Comments (1)

Letters to the Boston Globe: "Let's run Selective Service up the flagpole and see if anyone salutes"


[Edward Hasbrouck outside the Federal courthouse in Post Office Square, Boston, before his sentencing for refusal to register with the Selective Service System, 14 January 1983. Photo by Tom Landers, Boston Globe, via Getty Images]

The Boston Globe devotes its letters page today to a selection of responses to Jeff Jacoby’s column last Sunday, Women don’t register for the draft, and men shouldn’t either.

The letters to the Globe published today include one from me (as below, illustrated with a photo from the Globe archives of me outside the old Federal courthouse in Post Office Square in Boston before being sentenced for refusing to register for the draft on Martin Luther King, Jr., Day — not yet then a Federal holiday — in 1983) and one from another unrepentant 1980s draft registration resister, Stuart M. Wax.

(For why young men continue to resist draft registration today, and why it remains important for older allies of peace and freedom to support them, see Ethan Foote’s eloquent essay, Draft Registration Demands Resistance, recently published on Waging Nonviolence and on my Web site.)

While some of the other letters published by the Globe today support conscription in the form of a draft or compulsory national service, thay all made clear that the real debate about the draft and draft registration is about military conscription, not gender equality.

Continue reading "Letters to the Boston Globe: "Let's run Selective Service up the flagpole and see if anyone salutes""
Link | Posted by Edward, 26 June 2021, 05:47 ( 5:47 AM) | Comments (0)

Friday, 11 June 2021

Draft registration requirement for Federal student aid to be ended soon

The requirement for men age 18 and older to have registered with the Selective Service System for a possible military draft in order to be eligible for Federal student aid including Federally-guaranteed private student loans will be phased out over the next two months, according to an official letter to college and university financial administrators published today by the U.S. Department of Education.

Continue reading "Draft registration requirement for Federal student aid to be ended soon"
Link | Posted by Edward, 11 June 2021, 13:00 ( 1:00 PM) | Comments (0)

Bio | Blog | Blogroll | Books | Contact | Disclosures | Events | FAQs & Explainers | Home | Newsletter | Privacy | Resisters.Info | Search | Sitemap | The Amazing Race | The Identity Project | Travel Privacy & Human Rights | Twitter

"Don't believe anything just because you read it on the Internet. Anyone can say anything on the Internet, and they do. The Internet is the most effective medium in history for the rapid global propagation of rumor, myth, and false information." (From The Practical Nomad Guide to the Online Travel Marketplace, 2001)
RSS 2.0 feed of this blog
RSS 2.0 feed of this blog
RSS 1.0 feed of this blog
Powered by
Movable Type Open Source
Movable Type Open Source 5.2.13

Pegasus Mail
Pegasus Mail by David Harris
Notices